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Donald Sutherland Reflects on Storied Career Ahead of Governors Award

Donald Sutherland Reflects on Storied Career Ahead of Governors Award
Despite a storied career and some 180 screen credits, Donald Sutherland has never been nominated for an Academy Award. The closest he can recall being involved is he got to present one once. So he was shocked when he learned he had been selected as one of this year’s honorary Oscar recipients. But he’s been a favorite for some time, no doubt due in large part to the sense that the Academy is tardy in its recognition.

“I don’t think I’m overdue,” Sutherland says, “but certainly we’re running out of time at 82.”

The moment invites reflection on his career — a career that is still very much in progress, as his recent schedule has the professional traveling from Toronto to Los Angeles to Rome to perform at the top of his game for filmmakers including Danny Boyle and James Gray.

He’s had very few bad tastes left in his mouth over the years
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Playback: Honorary Oscar Recipient Donald Sutherland Reflects on His Career

Playback: Honorary Oscar Recipient Donald Sutherland Reflects on His Career
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

The film Academy’s Governors Awards ceremony is set for this weekend, honoring filmmakers Charles Burnett and Agnes Varda, cinematographer Owen Roizman and actor Donald Sutherland. Sutherland’s name in particular was a heavy favorite in advance of this year’s honorees announcement, as Oscar recognition for the esteemed star has been elusive. So it’s a perfect time to dive into one of the legendary screen careers.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

Sutherland is currently filming James Gray’s “Ad Astra” and Danny Boyle’s “Trust” (in which he plays oil tycoon J. Paul Getty). So while these kinds of things can have a “lifetime achievement” vibe for some, the actor is still very much at the top of his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Criterion Reflections – Episode 5 – Summer 1969 Part 2

  • CriterionCast
Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jon Laubinger, Jordan Essoe and William Remmers to discuss four titles from the Summer of 1969: Haskell Wexler’s Medium Cool, Alberto Isaac’s The Olympics in Mexico, Federico Fellini’s Fellini Satyricon, and Agnes Varda’s Lions Love (…and Lies).

Episode Time Markers Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:06:31 Medium Cool: 0:06:32 – 0:53:26 The Olympics in Mexico: 0:53:27 – 1:28:29 Fellini Satyricon: 1:28:30 – 2:20:24 Lions Love (and Lies…): 2:20:25 – 3:19:15 Medium Cool (8/27/69)

Criterion
See full article at CriterionCast »

Oscar Foreign-Language Rookies Overcame Daunting Odds

Oscar Foreign-Language Rookies Overcame Daunting Odds
The first foreign-language Oscar was presented in 1957, not so much to its director Federico Fellini as to the whole of Italy for his acclaimed “La Strada,” which beat out competition from Japan, Germany, France and Denmark. That year, only eight countries submitted films, but the number has increased sharply in the decades since, reaching new heights this year when 92 countries submitted titles for consideration — a record for the category.

Entries from Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria — countries torn by war, riven by natural disaster or simply lacking in any kind of industry infrastructure whatsoever — joined the race this year.

The nomination certainly came as a surprise for Mattie Do, whose second feature “Dearest Sister” was chosen to represent Laos.

“One day I woke up and there was an email from the Luang Prabang Film Festival announcing that they had facilitated the means for Laos to create a selection committee qualified to submit
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Furniture: Grotesque Extravagance in Fellini's Casanova

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail. Since the Honorary Oscars are handed out next week, here's a Donald Sutherland film for you!

Federico Fellini didn’t much like Giacomo Casanova, the famously amorous subject of his meandering fantasy-biopic. The director may not have liked Donald Sutherland, either. The actor was required to shave his head and sport both a false nose and a false chin to play the long-winded lover. The costumes aren’t especially flattering either. Fellini’s Casanova is an erotic descent into Hell, a grotesque pageant of 18th century moral abandon. It frequently borders on the disgusting.

It was also on the edge of Oscar’s attention, sliding into only two categories. While Fellini’s Casanova did win for its costumes, its production design missed out entirely. Anyone betting
See full article at FilmExperience »

Film Review: ‘A Bad Moms Christmas’

Film Review: ‘A Bad Moms Christmas’
Women moviegoers, as we know, are egregiously underserved by Hollywood (the fact that half the human race is treated as a demo is an indication of how caveman corporate the thinking is). Yet if women are underserved, mothers are openly ignored. That’s part of what made last year’s “Bad Moms” such a broadly effective and well-tossed comic grenade. It was just enough of a foul-mouthed, let’s-get-trashed-at-the-supermarket party comedy that you might say it snuck into the “women behaving badly” genre.

Mostly, though, it was about something all too real and (in the movies) new: the high-maintenance, low-reward, whatever-you-do-you-can’t-win experience of middle-class motherhood in the age of the Mommy Wars. The movie took a few swipes at how underappreciated mothers are, but mostly it was about how guilty they feel for failing, in one way or another, to live up to their own stressed-out standards of maternal enlightenment. “Bad Moms” saluted
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Greta Gerwig Reveals Inspirations for ‘Lady Bird,’ From ‘American Graffiti’ to ‘Carrie’ and More

  • Indiewire
Greta Gerwig Reveals Inspirations for ‘Lady Bird,’ From ‘American Graffiti’ to ‘Carrie’ and More
Later this week, fans of Greta Gerwig’s wholly charming brand of cinema are in for a very big treat when her solo directorial debut “Lady Bird” arrives in limited release. Already lauded on the festival circuit and considered something of an Oscar contender in a slew of categories, the film draws much of its inspiration from Gerwig’s own coming-of-age in suburban Sacramento. Featuring Saoirse Ronan as the eponymous Lady Bird (sure, her birth certificate says “Christine,” but the whipsmart high school senior doesn’t have much time for such restrictions), the film follows the restless teen as she comes to grips with the push-pull of home, family, friends, and boys, all as she’s about to go enter full-scale adulthood.

While Gerwig has been a bit cagey on the exact parallels between Lady Bird and herself (at a recent New York Film Festival press conference, the filmmaker said,
See full article at Indiewire »

Blu-ray Review – The Voice of the Moon (1990)

The Voice of the Moon (La Voce Della Luna, 1990)

Directed by Federico Fellini

Starring Roberto Benigni, Paolo Villaggio, Nadia Ottaviani, Marisa Tomasi, Angelo Orlando, Syusy Blady

Synopsis:

A recently released patient from a mental hospital has a series of fantastic adventures amidst a surreal landscape while trying to win the affections of his love.

Federico Fellini’s last film is a jaw-dropping experience. Bringing together a surreal template of dream logic with wry humour and sardonic swipes at society, The Voice of the Moon – or in Italian, La Voce Della Luna – provides the magical realism and wonder of life that the Italian filmmaker is best known for.

Adapted from Ermanno Cavazzoni’s poetic novel, the story follows the recently released mental patient Ivo Salvini (Roberto Benigni, Life is Beautiful) as he navigates his way around a strange and compelling landscape. He encounters the entrancing Aldina (Nadia Ottaviani) by accident and falls in love immediately.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive Interview – Greg McLean on his new film Jungle, working with Daniel Radcliffe and more

Alex Moreland chats with director Greg McLean about his new film Jungle

So, how did you first get involved with Jungle?

The script was sent to me from a producer in Australia; he’d worked with me before and said I might be interested in the story. So, I read the script – I was kind of dubious that it was all real, but then I read the book and realised it was a true story. I thought, “wow, this is pretty amazing” so I called him back and said “whatever I’ve got to do to get on this movie, I’d love to direct it”. So, it kind of went from there.

As you were saying there it’s based on a true story – how do you maintain a level of accuracy while also making a movie out of it as well?

The true story really does lend itself
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bob Hawkins, Longtime Variety Journalist in Italy, Dies at 93

Bob Hawkins, who spent more than 50 years at Variety, writing film reviews, covering film festivals, and oversreeing Variety‘s Rome office, died Oct. 14 in Rome. He was 93.

Hawkins was one of the first photographers to cover the Cannes Film Festival. He explained in the Variety book “Cannes: Fifty Years of Sun, Sex & Celluloid” that there were just a handful of paparazzi in the 1950s, although the term had yet to be invented by his friend Federico Fellini. The photographers rotated exclusives among themselves, and Hawkins remembered the time Grace Kelly speared him with a metal spike attached to a flower by accident, then granted him an exclusive photo as an apology.

Robert Hawkins was born in Genoa, Italy and attended Princeton U., where he started out writing movie reviews. Fluent in half a dozen languages, his love for film began at an early age when he traveled to the Venice Film Festival with his father before WWII.

During
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’

Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’
Lyon The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Helen Mirren Set for Chaplin Award, European Film Academy Honors Newcomers, and More — Awards Roundup

  • Indiewire
Helen Mirren Set for Chaplin Award, European Film Academy Honors Newcomers, and More — Awards Roundup
Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our bi-weekly Awards Roundup column.

– The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced that Academy Award–winning actor Helen Mirren will be honored at the 45th Chaplin Award Gala on Monday, April 30, 2018. A beloved figure of stage, screen, and television, Mirren has bestowed upon the world a series of iconic performances in a career spanning more than fifty years. The annual event will be attended by a host of notable guests and presenters and will include movie and interview clips, culminating in the presentation of the Chaplin Award.

“It is an honor and a pleasure for us to present Helen Mirren with our 45th Chaplin Award,” said Ann Tenenbaum, the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Board Chairman. “From housemaid to Queen and everything in between, Ms. Mirren has delivered masterful performances of complex characters, upending stereotype after stereotype along the way.
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Brawl in Cell Block 99,’ ‘The Meyerowitz Stories,’ ‘War for the Planet of the Apes,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

78/52 (Alexandre Philippe)

There’s been documentaries that analyze entire cinematic movements, directors, actors, writers, specific films, and more aspects of filmmaking, but it’s rare to see a feature film devoted to a single scene. With 78/52, if the clunky title addition didn’t tell you already, it explores the infamous shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho with exacting precision and depth. Featuring interviews with Jamie Lee Curtis, Guillermo del Toro,
See full article at The Film Stage »

AFI's Star Teachers: When Spielberg and Hitchcock Taught Directing

AFI's Star Teachers: When Spielberg and Hitchcock Taught Directing
Robert Altman, Bernardo Bertolucci, Mel Brooks, Robert De Niro, Clint Eastwood, Federico Fellini, Martin Scorsese — scores of cinematic geniuses have given guest lectures at AFI over the past 50 years and answered questions from classrooms full of future cinematic geniuses. THR was given access to the archives for a few choice highlights.

This story first appeared in the Oct. 4 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Mario Bava’s Erik The Conqueror – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Italian directors have always had a penchant for jumping on the cinematic bandwagon whenever a popular film is released. And we aren’t talking about just a couple of directors and a couple of films, but nearly all directors and, depending upon the genre, sometimes hundreds of films. Thus, we have the pepla of the 1950’s and 1960’s, the poliziotteschi and gialli of the 1970’s, the spaghetti westerns of the 1960’s and early 1970’s, the Jaws-inspired rip-offs, the Alien-inspired ripoffs, and the zombie and jungle/cannibal epics of the 1980’s. But, with the international sensation of the Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis vehicle entitled The Vikings in 1958, Italians were quick to jump on this particular bandwagon as well, resulting in a seven-year cycle of Viking films. And Mario Bava, best known for his proto-slashers and horror vehicles, was not averse to climbing on the bandwagon occasionally himself.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Susanna Nicchiarelli’s “Nico, 1988” Acquired by Magnolia Pictures

Nico, 1988”

Susanna Nicchiarelli’s award-winning drama about Christa Päffgen, better known as Nico, has secured distribution. Deadline reports that Magnolia Pictures snagged the U.S. rights to “Nico, 1988” and is planning a theatrical release for sometime in 2018. Trine Dyrholm (“The Commune”) portrays the Danish multi-hyphenate, who is best known for providing vocals on the Velvet Underground’s debut album, being a muse to Andy Warhol, and acting in Warhol’s “Chelsea Girls” and Federico Fellini’s “La Dolce Vita.” She was also a musician and songwriter.

Nico, 1988” takes an atypical approach to telling Nico’s story. Rather than depict the glamorous height of her fame, the film “centers on the final two years of Nico’s life in 1987 and 1988, approaching 50 and living a solitary life in Manchester,” the source summarizes. “Her manager Richard (John Gordon Sinclair) convinces her to hit the road again and tour Europe to promote her latest album. Struggling with her demons and the consequences of a muddled life, she longs to rebuild a relationship with her son, whose custody she lost long ago.”

The biopic won the Horizons competition at this year’s Venice Film Festival.

Nico, 1988” isn’t the first woman-directed film focused on Nico. Susan Ofteringer helmed the 1996 documentary “Nico-Icon.”

Nicchiarelli’s previous credits include “Cosmonaut” and “Esca viva.”

You can check out a trailer for “Nico, 1988” below.

https://medium.com/media/37ced21d5906f91853caff2db3482291/href

Susanna Nicchiarelli’s “Nico, 1988” Acquired by Magnolia Pictures was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Jake Gyllenhaal’s Favorite Films, From ‘Adam’s Rib’ to ‘A Separation’

  • Indiewire
Jake Gyllenhaal’s Favorite Films, From ‘Adam’s Rib’ to ‘A Separation’
From the works of Federico Fellini to Cameron Crowe, Gyllenhaal’s top choices include both cinematic milestones and nostalgic hits.

Related stories'Stronger' Review: Jake Gyllenhaal Is Riveting in David Gordon Green's Boston Marathon Bombing Biopic -- Tiff'Stronger' Trailer: Jake Gyllenhaal and Tatiana Maslany Look Incredible in Boston Bombing Drama'Nightcrawler' Director Dan Gilroy Reteaming With Jake Gyllenhaal and Rene Russo for New Film
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Reflections – Episode 2 – Winter 1969 Part 2

  • CriterionCast
Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Martin Kessler, Jordan Essoe, Doug McCambridge, Jason Beamish and Trevor Berrett to discuss six titles from the Winter of 1969: Jaromil Jires’s The Joke, Juraj Herz’s The Cremator, Wim Winders’s Silver City Revisited, Fellini: A Director’s Notebook, Luis Bunuel’s The Milky Way and Pierre Etaix’s Le Grand Amour.

Episode Time Markers: Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:09:47 The Joke: 0:09:48 – 0:36:30 Silver City Revisited: 0:36:31 – 0:54:30 The Cremator: 0:54:31 – 1:17:
See full article at CriterionCast »

Otd: Yul Marries, Macy Screams, Fellini Premieres

on this day in showbiz-related history...

1944 Yul Brynner marries his first wife, actress Virginia Gilmore, in Los Angeles. They're both in their mid 20s. She's already made 15 movies but he's just starting out with two Broadway shows under his belt. Their marriage will last 16 years and they will have one child together. Rock Brynner (their son) will go on to write a book about his dad and their family history.

1954 Federico Fellini's La Strada premieres at the Venice Film Festival and goes on to win the Best Foreign Film Oscar. Fellini will go on to completely own that category, winning thrice more with The Nights of Cabiria (1957), 8½ (1963), and Amarcord (1974)

Macy Gray, The King's Speech, and more after the jump...
See full article at FilmExperience »
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